REFRIGERATORS RELIABILITY - REFRIGERATORS


REFRIGERATORS RELIABILITY - REFRIGERATOR PARTS LIST - FRENCH DOOR REFRIGERATOR WITH WATER DISPENSER.



Refrigerators Reliability





refrigerators reliability






    refrigerators
  • An appliance or compartment that is artificially kept cool and used to store food and drink. Modern refrigerators generally make use of the cooling effect produced when a volatile liquid is forced to evaporate in a sealed system in which it can be condensed back to liquid outside the refrigerator

  • (refrigerator) white goods in which food can be stored at low temperatures

  • A refrigerator is a cooling apparatus. The common household appliance (often called a "fridge" for short) comprises a thermally insulated compartment and a heat pump—chemical or mechanical means—to transfer heat from it to the external environment (i.e.

  • (Refrigerator (horse)) Refrigerator was an Appendix Quarter horse racehorse who won the Champions of Champions race three times. He was a 1988 bay gelding sired by Rare Jet and out of Native Parr.





    reliability
  • (reliable) authentic: conforming to fact and therefore worthy of belief; "an authentic account by an eyewitness"; "reliable information"

  • In computer networking, a reliable protocol is one that provides reliability properties with respect to the delivery of data to the intended recipient(s), as opposed to an unreliable protocol, which does not provide notifications to the sender as to the delivery of transmitted data.

  • dependability: the quality of being dependable or reliable











refrigerators reliability - Reliability Physics




Reliability Physics and Engineering: Time-To-Failure Modeling


Reliability Physics and Engineering: Time-To-Failure Modeling



This book provides the basic Reliability Physics and Engineering tools that are needed by Electrical Engineers, Mechanical Engineers, Materials Scientists, and Applied Physicists to build better products. The material includes information for engineers to develop better methodologies for producing reliable product designs and materials selections to improve product reliability. Important statistical training and tools are contained within the text. The author emphasizes the physics of failure and the development of reliability engineering models for failure.
The beginning of the book concentrates on device/materials degradation and the development of the critically important time-to-failure models. Since time-to-failure is a statistical process, the needed statistical tools are presented next along with failure-rate modeling. Following that the use of accelerated testing and the modeling of the acceleration factors are presented. The next section focuses on the effective use of these acceleration factors, during initial product-level testing and operation, in order to reduce the expected device failure rate in the field. The important time-to-failure models are presented next for Electrical Engineering applications. Likewise, the next section addresses important time-to-failure models for Mechanical Engineering applications. The final chapters provide both Electrical and Mechanical Engineers with design help specifically, conversion of dynamic/transient stresses into equivalent static forms, establishing aggressive but safe design rules, and the need to look very closely at design and process interactions.










86% (19)





1931 Bugatti Royale Berline de Voyage 24




1931 Bugatti Royale Berline de Voyage 24





The Bugatti Type 41, better known as the Royale, was a large luxury car with a 4.3 m (169.3 in) wheelbase and 6.4 m (21 ft) overall length. It weighed approximately 3175 kg (7000 lb) and used a 12.7 L (12763 cc/778 in?) straight-8 engine.
For comparison, the Royale is about as heavy as a large modern commercial pickup truck, such as a Ford Super Duty F-450, but it is about 10% longer. When compared to the modern Rolls-Royce Phantom, it is about 20% longer, and more than 25% heavier.
Ettore Bugatti planned to build twenty-five of these cars, and sell them to royalty. But even royalty was not buying such things during the Great Depression, and Bugatti was able to sell only three of the six made. Today a Bugatti Royale is both one of the largest and rarest cars in the world
Crafted by Ettore Bugatti, the Type 41 is said to have come about because he took exception to the comments of an English lady who compared his cars unfavourably with those of Rolls-Royce.
The prototype had a near 15-litre capacity, the production of 12.7 litres engine (apx. 4.5 ft (1.4 m) long x 3.5 ft (1.1 m) high), is one of the largest automobile engines ever made, producing 205 to 223 kW (275 to 300 hp). Its cylinders, bored to 125 by 130 mm (5.1 in), each displaced more than the entire engine of the contemporary Type 40 touring car. It had 3 valves per cylinder driven by a single overhead camshaft. Nine bearings were specified for reliability, but only a single custom carburettor was needed.
All Royales were individually bodied, but its cast "Roue Royale" wheels measured 610 mm (24 inches) in diameter. The radiator cap was a posed elephant, a sculpture by Ettore's brother Rembrandt Bugatti.
French National Railway SNCF
The final aesthetically beautiful overhead camshaft engine, a 770 lb (350 kg) sculpture in turned aluminium, proved to be one of Ettore's greatest successes, but initially a failure commercially. To utilize the remaining 23 engines after the final Royale was built, Bugatti built a rail car powered by either two or four of the eight-cylinder units. 79 were built for the French National Railway SNCF, using a further 186 engines, and remained in use until the 1960s - turning the episode from an economic failure into a success for Bugatti. One took a world average speed record of 122 mph (196 km/h) for 43.9 miles (70.7 km).
41.150 - Berline de Voyage
The sixth car is chassis no.41.150
Known as the Berline de Voyage
Unsold, it was kept by Bugatti
Bricked up with 41.110 and 41.141 during World War II at the home of the Bugatti family in Ermenonville, to avoid being commandeered by the Nazis.
Sold together with 41.141 by L'Ebe Bugatti in 1950 to American Le Mans racer Briggs Cunningham, in return for a small but undisclosed sum of money, plus a couple of new General Electric refrigerators, then unavailable in post-war France.[1]
On their arrival in the United States, Cunningham sold 41.150, which found its way into The Harrah Collection.The car was then sold at the 1986 Harrah auction where Jerry J. Moore paid $6.5 million for it, he kept it for 1 year and then sold it to Tom Monaghan for $8.1 million.
In 1991, Tom Monaghan, founder of Domino's Pizza, sold 41.150 for US$8,000,000, which was actually less than the ?5.7 million (US$8.1 million) for which he purchased it in 1987 from Jerry J. Moore.
The car was sold to the Blackhawk Collection in Danville, California, where it has been on display at various times.












1931 Bugatti Royale Berline de Voyage front




1931 Bugatti Royale Berline de Voyage front





The Bugatti Type 41, better known as the Royale, was a large luxury car with a 4.3 m (169.3 in) wheelbase and 6.4 m (21 ft) overall length. It weighed approximately 3175 kg (7000 lb) and used a 12.7 L (12763 cc/778 in?) straight-8 engine.
For comparison, the Royale is about as heavy as a large modern commercial pickup truck, such as a Ford Super Duty F-450, but it is about 10% longer. When compared to the modern Rolls-Royce Phantom, it is about 20% longer, and more than 25% heavier.
Ettore Bugatti planned to build twenty-five of these cars, and sell them to royalty. But even royalty was not buying such things during the Great Depression, and Bugatti was able to sell only three of the six made. Today a Bugatti Royale is both one of the largest and rarest cars in the world
Crafted by Ettore Bugatti, the Type 41 is said to have come about because he took exception to the comments of an English lady who compared his cars unfavourably with those of Rolls-Royce.
The prototype had a near 15-litre capacity, the production of 12.7 litres engine (apx. 4.5 ft (1.4 m) long x 3.5 ft (1.1 m) high), is one of the largest automobile engines ever made, producing 205 to 223 kW (275 to 300 hp). Its cylinders, bored to 125 by 130 mm (5.1 in), each displaced more than the entire engine of the contemporary Type 40 touring car. It had 3 valves per cylinder driven by a single overhead camshaft. Nine bearings were specified for reliability, but only a single custom carburettor was needed.
All Royales were individually bodied, but its cast "Roue Royale" wheels measured 610 mm (24 inches) in diameter. The radiator cap was a posed elephant, a sculpture by Ettore's brother Rembrandt Bugatti.
French National Railway SNCF
The final aesthetically beautiful overhead camshaft engine, a 770 lb (350 kg) sculpture in turned aluminium, proved to be one of Ettore's greatest successes, but initially a failure commercially. To utilize the remaining 23 engines after the final Royale was built, Bugatti built a rail car powered by either two or four of the eight-cylinder units. 79 were built for the French National Railway SNCF, using a further 186 engines, and remained in use until the 1960s - turning the episode from an economic failure into a success for Bugatti. One took a world average speed record of 122 mph (196 km/h) for 43.9 miles (70.7 km).
41.150 - Berline de Voyage
The sixth car is chassis no.41.150
Known as the Berline de Voyage
Unsold, it was kept by Bugatti
Bricked up with 41.110 and 41.141 during World War II at the home of the Bugatti family in Ermenonville, to avoid being commandeered by the Nazis.
Sold together with 41.141 by L'Ebe Bugatti in 1950 to American Le Mans racer Briggs Cunningham, in return for a small but undisclosed sum of money, plus a couple of new General Electric refrigerators, then unavailable in post-war France.[1]
On their arrival in the United States, Cunningham sold 41.150, which found its way into The Harrah Collection.The car was then sold at the 1986 Harrah auction where Jerry J. Moore paid $6.5 million for it, he kept it for 1 year and then sold it to Tom Monaghan for $8.1 million.
In 1991, Tom Monaghan, founder of Domino's Pizza, sold 41.150 for US$8,000,000, which was actually less than the ?5.7 million (US$8.1 million) for which he purchased it in 1987 from Jerry J. Moore.
The car was sold to the Blackhawk Collection in Danville, California, where it has been on display at various times.









refrigerators reliability







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